July 2, 2019: New Living Textbook Section on Inpatient Endpoints in Pragmatic Clinical Trials

A new section in the Living Textbook describes the considerations for using “real-world” data for inpatient-based event ascertainment. There are many sources for acquiring this information, and they have different time lags in their availability and varying degrees of error and bias. In order to use inpatient endpoints in pragmatic clinical trials, these factors must be understood during the design, conduct, and analysis phases of an embedded pragmatic clinical trial.

“The pragmatic trial community needs to collectively determine which endpoints are relevant for pragmatic trials, how they can be measured and validated, and how the accuracy of these measurement methods may impact hypothesis testing sample size estimates.” —Eisenstein et al 2019

Topics in the chapter include:

  • Pragmatic trial inpatient endpoints
  • Inpatient event data sources
  • Patient-reported data
  • Secondary data sources: EHR
  • Secondary data sources: claims
  • Case studies: ICD-Pieces, TRANSFORM-HF, ADAPTABLE, and TRANSLATE ACS
  • Data source accuracy

 

May 10, 2019: Treating Data as an Asset: Data Entrepreneurship in the Service of Patients (Eric Perakslis, PhD)

Speaker

Eric D. Perakslis MS, PhD
Rubenstein Fellow, Duke University
Lecturer, Department of Biomedical Informatics
Harvard Medical School

Topic

Treating Data as an Asset: Data Entrepreneurship in the Service of Patients

Keywords

Digital health; Health data; General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR); Data sharing

Key Points

  • The only 100% common element of digital transformation across all industries is data.
  • With data and digital transformation, patients are changing: They are active, connected, informed, and savvy.
  • Security, compliance, and privacy are different things.

Discussion Themes

Is there any hope of data sharing policies helping to bridge the micro and macro silos of healthcare data?

As data starts to flows through institutions, it ends up in multiple places. Part of sharing data is protecting a single source of truth.

If something is relevant to the bedside, it’s worth doing.

Read Dr. Perakslis’s commentary in The Lancet (May 2019).

Tags

#healthdata, #pctGR, @Collaboratory1

July 30, 2018: Registration Open for 3rd Seattle Symposium on Health Care Data Analytics

Registration is open for the 3rd Seattle Symposium on Health Care Data Analytics. The symposium will bring together biostatisticians, health informaticists, epidemiologists, and other data scientists to discuss health research and methods that involve large health care databases.

Experts involved in national research initiatives that use large health care databases will discuss methodological challenges encountered in this setting and share ideas for addressing them. Speakers will share their research on:

  • statistical approaches to learning from electronic health care data;
  • methods for precision medicine; and
  • health policy.

Space is limited, and registration is required.

The event is sponsored by the Biostatistics Unit at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute and the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Washington.

Mobile Health (mHealth) Research Platform to Launch


In recent health information technology news, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), has received a 5-year National Institutes of Health award to support its launch of a cardiovascular mHealth platform. The research platform, to be named Health ePeople, will build on the successes of UCSF’s Health eHeart Study, which began in 2013. That study, with more than 30,000 participants worldwide, uses the power of mobile technologies to collect cardiovascular data and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) from study participants.

The Health ePeople platform will advance mHealth by providing researchers with easy access to a large cohort of volunteers, along with a quick, affordable means for collecting their health data through mobile and wireless technologies. Though the platform will not be ready to enroll new participants for several months, people who want to participate in the cohort can sign up through the Health eHeart Study website.

For information and short videos on mHealth technologies, visit the Living Textbook’s chapter on mHealth and PROs.


Latest Truven Health Analytics–NPR Health Poll on Medical Data Privacy


How concerned are people about the privacy of their medical information? Not very—according to the November 2014 Truven Health Analytics–NPR Health Poll (opens as PDF). The poll asked how respondents feel about sharing their electronic health information and other data with researchers, employers, health plans, and their doctors. The majority expressed a willingness to share their anonymized health information with researchers; less than a quarter expressed willingness to share non-healthcare data with their healthcare providers.

Each month, the Truven Health Analytics–NPR Health Poll surveys approximately 3,000 Americans to gauge attitudes and opinions on a wide range of healthcare issues. Poll results are reported by NPR on the health blog Shots. Among the results of this survey:

  • 74% of respondents indicated that their physician uses an electronic medical record system.
  • 68% of respondents would share their health information anonymously with researchers.
  • 44% of respondents have looked through their health information kept by their physician.

The survey analyses were stratified by age, education, generation, and income. Poll questions were posed by cell phone, land line, and online during the first half of August 2014. The margin of error was plus or minus 1.8 percentage points. An executive summary of the survey, including questions and survey data, is here.