January 22, 2019: New Self-Paced ePCT Training Course Available

The NIH Collaboratory is pleased to announce the availability of a new self-paced, 10-module introductory course on how to design, conduct, and disseminate embedded PCTs (ePCTs). This course presents condensed material from the inaugural ePCT Training Workshop held in 2018 and provides users with important things to know and do when designing an ePCT, along with helpful links to additional learning resources within the Living Textbook.

Also available in the Living Textbook are links to videocast workshops hosted by the NIH on a range of ePCT topics including:

  • Embedded PCTs of therapeutic A versus B interventions
  • Unique opportunities for disseminating, implementing, and sustaining evidence-based practices into clinical care
  • Ethical and regulatory issues of PCTs

For these and other ePCT resources, visit the Training Resources webpage.

November 13, 2018: Summary of Workshop on Pragmatic Trials of Therapeutic A vs B Interventions Now Available

The NIH Collaboratory recently convened a workshop to explore embedded pragmatic clinical trials comparing two or more therapeutic medical interventions. These “A vs B” trials are meant to test existing, viable treatment alternatives where there is uncertainty about which treatment is best in which populations. There are unique barriers that make these types of pragmatic trials especially challenging to implement. For the workshop, a panel of experts gathered to discuss challenges and solutions regarding partnering with healthcare systems to conduct the trials, unique legal and ethical issues, and design and operational considerations. The summary of the workshop is now available: Workshop Summary: Embedded Pragmatic Clinical Trials of Therapeutic A vs. B Interventions

 

Additional Resources:

Embedded pragmatic clinical trials of therapeutic A vs. B interventions workshop videocast.

 

September 28, 2018: Assessing and Reducing Risk of Re-identification When Sharing Sensitive Research Datasets (Greg Simon, MD, MPH, Deven McGraw, JD, MPH, Khaled El Emam, PhD)

Speakers

Gregory Simon MD, MPH
Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Deven McGraw, JD, MPH, LLM
General Counsel & Chief Regulatory Officer, Ciitizen

Khaled El Emam, PhD
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa
Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute

Topic

Assessing and Reducing Risk of Re-identification When Sharing Sensitive Research Datasets

Keywords

Clinical trials; Research ethics; Data security; Data sharing; Sensitive research data; De-identified data

Key Points

  • The cycle of risk de-identification involves setting a risk threshold, measuring the risk, evaluating the risk, and applying transformations to reduce the risk.
  • The Safe Harbor method of de-identification (removal of 18 categories of data) is a legal minimum standard that does not take context into account, and may not be sufficient when sharing sensitive data publicly.
  • A higher standard for de-identification is the “Expert Determination” method, whereby an expert with contextual knowledge of the broader data ecosystem can determine whether the risk is “not greater than very small.”
  • With increasing concern about the risks of sensitive data sharing, it is important to be transparent with data participants and continue to build trust for data uses.

Discussion Themes

When is a dataset safe for sharing? What is the risk of re-identification, and how can we reduce the risk? Consider who you are releasing the data to and what other kinds of data might they have access to that could potentially lead to re-identification.

For more information on the de-identification of protected health information, visit the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’s Guidance Regarding Methods for De-identification of Protected Health Information in Accordance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule.

The Health Information Trust Alliance de-identification framework identifies 12 criteria for a successful de-identification program and methodology.

Tags

#pctGR, #PragmaticTrials, #HealthData, @HealthPrivacy @Collaboratory1, @PCTGrandRounds

October 1, 2018: Meeting Minutes from NIH Collaboratory’s Ethics and Regulatory Core Discussions with the New Demonstration Projects

Meeting minutes and supplementary materials are available that summarize discussions related to the ethics and regulatory issues associated with each of the new UG3 Demonstration Projects. These discussions, which took place by teleconference, included representation from study principal investigators and study teams, members of the NIH Collaboratory Ethics and Regulatory Core, NIH staff, and NIH Collaboratory Coordinating Center personnel as well as some IRBs responsible for oversight of the projects.

March 15, 2018: New Resource for Understanding Ethical and Regulatory Architecture of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Data

Using patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) data requires balancing the need for sufficient private health information to support meaningful research with the need to protect patient privacy and autonomy. In support of this dual goal, The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) has just released a document that provides a collection of tools and resources aimed at helping a broad audience of stakeholders understand the ethical and regulatory requirements related to collecting, using, sharing, and disclosing PCOR data.

“An architecture is necessary to ensure patient privacy is protected and health information is appropriately secured during collection, access, use, and disclosure as required by law, regulation, and/or policy.” —Legal and Ethical Architecture for PCOR Data

PCOR data will help expand the evidence base for therapies and improve health outcomes for individual patients.

Read the full document: Legal and Ethical Architecture for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR) Data (“Architecture”)

The document is divided into 5 chapters:

Chapter 1: Overview of Legal and Ethical Architecture for PCOR Data provides background for the project and an overview of key ethical and regulatory requirements.

Chapter 2: Legal and Ethical Significance of Data for PCOR describes fundamental concepts for organizing data into categories such that legal and ethical frameworks can be applied. The chapter includes key considerations and types of data relevant to PCOR, such as clinical, administrative, patient-generated, etc.

Chapter 3: Linking Legal and Ethical Requirements to PCOR Data organizes the relevant legal provisions according to the key data considerations outlined in Chapter 2: identifiability, subject, source, access and use/purpose, consent/authorization, security, and legal status.

Chapter 4: Framework for Navigating Legal and Ethical Requirements for PCOR is designed as a decision tool that builds on the key data considerations described in Chapters 2 and 3. The goal of this chapter is to help researchers determine whether laws apply to particular data and if so, what requirements to attach to their collection and use.

Chapter 5: Mapping Research Flows to Legal Requirements identifies 6 hypothetical use cases, identifies decision trigger points, and maps representative data flows to the relevant legal requirements.