July 2, 2019: New Living Textbook Section on Inpatient Endpoints in Pragmatic Clinical Trials

A new section in the Living Textbook describes the considerations for using “real-world” data for inpatient-based event ascertainment. There are many sources for acquiring this information, and they have different time lags in their availability and varying degrees of error and bias. In order to use inpatient endpoints in pragmatic clinical trials, these factors must be understood during the design, conduct, and analysis phases of an embedded pragmatic clinical trial.

“The pragmatic trial community needs to collectively determine which endpoints are relevant for pragmatic trials, how they can be measured and validated, and how the accuracy of these measurement methods may impact hypothesis testing sample size estimates.” —Eisenstein et al 2019

Topics in the chapter include:

  • Pragmatic trial inpatient endpoints
  • Inpatient event data sources
  • Patient-reported data
  • Secondary data sources: EHR
  • Secondary data sources: claims
  • Case studies: ICD-Pieces, TRANSFORM-HF, ADAPTABLE, and TRANSLATE ACS
  • Data source accuracy

 

March 5, 2019: New Living Textbook Section on Using Death as an Endpoint

Using death as an endpoint in pragmatic clinical trials is challenging because there are no standardized processes for ascertaining patient deaths in the United States. If a patient dies outside of a clinical care system, ascertaining if and how a death has occurred is considerably complicated. There are multiple sources of vital statistics data, each with different amounts of lag time, linking approaches, costs, and specificity of information. For example, some sources include cause of death while others include only fact of death; some have a lag time of a few months and some may take over a year; some charge by the individual file and some have an annual subscription fee.

This section of the Living Textbook describes different death data sources, how to obtain information from them, and the pros and cons of each.

“Death identification and adjudication may be more complicated with pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) that rely on data collected from the patient’s electronic health record (EHR), medical claims, self-report, or medical devices.” —Eisenstein E, et al. Choosing and Specifying Endpoints and Outcomes: Using Death as an Endpoint. In: Rethinking Clinical Trials: A Living Textbook of Pragmatic Clinical Trials.

The sources of data described in this section include the Death Master File, the Medicare Master Beneficiary Summary File, state vital statistics, the Fact of Death File, the National Death Index, and call centers. The section also presents a case study to illustrate a hybrid death identification and verification approach used in the ToRsemide compArisoN with furoSemide FOR Management of Heart Failure (TRANSFORM-HF) PCT (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03296813).