November 8, 2019: Lumbar Imaging with Reporting of Epidemiology: Initial Results and Some Lessons Learned (Jeffrey Jarvik, MD, MPH, Patrick Heagerty, PhD)

Speakers

Jeffrey (Jerry) G. Jarvik MD MPH
Professor, Radiology, Neurological Surgery and Health Services
Adjunct Professor, Pharmacy and Orthopedics & Sports Medicine
University of Washington

Patrick Heagerty, PhD
Professor and Chair
Department of Biostatistics
University of Washington

Topic

Lumbar Imaging with Reporting of Epidemiology: Initial Results and Some Lessons Learned

Keywords

Embedded pragmatic clinical trials; Radiology imaging; LIRE; Stepped-wedge; Cluster randomization; Epidemiology; Back pain

Key Points

  • The LIRE Demonstration Project evaluated whether prevalence benchmark data inserted into lumbar spine imaging reports would reduce overall spine-related healthcare utilization for patients referred from primary care.
  • The inserted intervention text urges caution when interpreting the presence of certain findings that are common in normal, pain-free volunteers.
  • While the study team found no decrease in spine-related healthcare utilization for the overall cohort, there was a small but potentially important effect on reducing opioid prescriptions.

Discussion Themes

A characteristic of stepped-wedge study design is that it yields two comparisons: between-group comparisons (clinic A vs clinic B) and within-group comparisons. But temporal trends can have an impact and must be adjusted for in the analysis.

For what type of intervention would a stepped-wedge design be suitable?

The hope is for a wider dissemination about interventions where radiologic testing is done and incidental findings are common.

Read more about the LIRE Demonstration Project.

Tags
#pctGR, #PragmaticTrials, @Collaboratory1