May 5, 2018: New Article Explores Opportunities for Funding the Training of Future Health Services Researchers

In a new article, Dr. Vincent Mor, an NIH Collaboratory investigator, and Dr. Paul Wallace describe the history, current status, and opportunities for funding training in health services research (HSR). While the number of organizations seeking to solve problems with health services research has been expanding, direct government support for HSR is declining. The authors project 5 key challenges for the field and its professional development:

  • Formulating and prioritizing research topics
  • Whether to use team- or individual-based approaches
  • How new data sources, analytic methods, and the need for faster results affect supply and demand for HSR
  • Shifts from public to institutional funding and the associated effects on generalizability
  • Balancing proprietary concerns regarding data, predictive models, and study results with the need to improve public health and rapidly disseminate information

According to the authors, sustainable solution will involve active collaboration between those who use HSR as a part of decision-making (and will likely pay for it) and those who produce it.

“We believe that the key change needed to productively address the above challenges will be a closer collaboration between HSR users, especially health systems, and academic HSR training programs to work towards producing timely, internally relevant, and externally generalizable knowledge (Mor and Wallace 2018).”

Dr. Mor is a principal investigator for the Pragmatic Trial of Video Education in Nursing Homes (PROVEN) trial, one of the NIH Collaboratory Demonstration Projects.

Mor V, Wallace P. 2018.  Funding the Training of Future Health Services Researchers. Health Services Research. doi:10.1111/1475-6773.12844.

CTTI Releases 2015 Annual Report


The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) has released its Annual Report for 2015. The report describes major achievements from the previous year, including new recommendations and related tools and checklists for improving the safety, efficiency, and overall quality of clinical research.

Cover page of CTTI Annual Report with embedded link to CTTI webpage containing report.
2015 CTTI Annual Report

Highlights of the 2015 Annual Report include recommendations on topics including:

  • Ethics review processes
  • Good Clinical Practice training for trial investigators
  • Research protocol design
  • Engagement of patient groups as equal partners in clinical research
  • Informed consent processes
  • Safety reporting systems for research participants

A public-private partnership whose many stakeholders include government agencies, advocacy groups, professional societies, academic research organizations, and representatives from the medical products industry, CTTI’s mission is to “identify and promote practices that will increase the quality and efficiency of clinical trials.”

A PDF version of the report is available here. Previous Annual Reports are also available on the CTTI website.


 

New Guidance Document on Training Front-Line Staff & Clinicians in PCTs


Tools for ResearchThe NIH Collaboratory’s Health Care Systems Interactions Core has published a guidance document entitled Considerations for Training Front-Line Staff and Clinicians on Pragmatic Clinical Trial Procedures. The purpose of this guidance is to help pragmatic clinical trial (PCT) teams plan training for study procedures that involve front-line clinicians and staff. The content was developed by drawing on trial-specific experience from the NIH Collaboratory Demonstration Projects. The document describes how training for PCTs will differ from training conducted for typical research studies, and includes a list of specific considerations, real-world examples, a checklist for PCT training design, and links to additional resources.

Other tools available from the Health Care Systems Interactions Core include an introduction to PCTs slide set.