December 7, 2018: Cluster Randomized Trials in Health Care Delivery Systems: Lessons from STIC2IT (Niteesh K. Choudhry, MD, PhD)

Speaker

Niteesh K. Choudhry, MD, PhD
Professor, Harvard Medical School
Executive Director, Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Topic

Cluster Randomized Trials in Health Care Delivery Systems: Lessons from STIC2IT

Keywords

STIC2IT; Pragmatic clinical trial; Learning health system; Cluster randomization; Medication adherence; Telepharmacy; Electronic health record; Stakeholder engagement

Key Points

  • STIC2IT, a pragmatic, cluster-randomized trial, evaluated a telepharmacy intervention to improve medication adherence for people with chronic diseases.
  • Pragmatic aspects of STIC2IT included outcomes assessed using routinely collected data, cluster randomization by physician practice, intention-to-treat analysis, and use of the EHR to collect research data.
  •  While medication adherence did improve in the STIC2IT intervention group, secondary clinical outcomes did not improve. Future trials within health systems should incorporate multilevel engagement across the health system, physicians and staff, and patients.

Discussion Themes

It is important to do ongoing outreach at the health system leadership level to ensure understanding and commitment to the study and keep providers aware of the trial. Study teams should be mindful of the priorities of their partner health system.

Using the EHR for research data required some upfront work building special modules and generating custom reports.

For more information on conducting PCTs in health delivery systems, visit the Living Textbook chapter on engaging stakeholders and building partnerships.

Tags

@Collaboratory1, #pctGR, #HarvardMed, #telepharmacy

November 16, 2018: Primary Palliative Care for Emergency Medicine (PRIM-ER) (Corita Grudzen, MD, MSHS)

Speaker

Corita R. Grudzen, MD, MSHS, FACEP
Vice Chair for Research
Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Population Health
Ronald O. Perelman Department of Emergency Medicine
NYU School of Medicine

Topic

Primary Palliative Care for Emergency Medicine (PRIM-ER)

Keywords

PRIM-ER; Emergency department; Palliative care; Demonstration project; Pragmatic trial; Stepped-wedge study design; Clinical decision support; Best practice alerts; Advance care planning

Key Point

  • The PRIM-ER trial is a pragmatic, cluster-randomized, stepped wedge Demonstration Project that will implement primary palliative care in emergency medicine across a diverse group of 35 emergency departments (EDs).
  • PRIM-ER’s clinical decision support intervention is tailored to each ED site. The study aims to enable system, organizational, and provider change in the emergency department workflow.
  • The study team is identifying and preparing site champions by conducting communication skills training in serious illness for emergency physicians and staff using the EM Talk program.

Discussion Themes

It is important to consider sustainability of the intervention during the planning phase of the trial. Plan for staff turnover and how new staff will be educated and oriented to the intervention.

The volume and sophistication of best practice alerts (BPAs) received by physicians varies across U.S. emergency departments. Alert “fatigue” can be a concern.

For more information on the PRIM-ER Demonstration Project, visit the PRIM-ER website on the Living Textbook.

Tags

@Collaboratory1, #pctGR, #EmergencyMedicine

November 12, 2018: Participate in the NIH Office of Disease Prevention’s Research Expertise Survey

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Disease Prevention (ODP) needs your help to enhance the quality of research supported by the NIH. The ODP is building a directory of experts in research methods and study designs that can help NIH Scientific Review Officers identify the most appropriate reviewers for NIH research applications. Adding your name and expertise to the directory is easy – simply share your methodological and content area expertise by filling out the ODP’s Prevention Research Expertise Survey (PRES).


 

The survey covers 7 areas related (but not limited) to prevention research:

  • Study Design Topics
  • Research Methods
  • Content Topics
  • Settings
  • Populations
  • Regions
  • Income Categories

The PRES takes approximately 15-25 minutes and is strictly voluntary. Based on your skill set and interest, NIH or Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) staff may invite you to serve as a peer reviewer for research applications, or you may be asked to sit on a panel, committee, or workgroup; or to speak at a seminar or workshop. Your responses and information will not be shared with anyone outside of HHS.

The ODP believes the participation of highly qualified methods experts will enhance the quality of peer review; improve the rigor, reproducibility, and impact of research supported by the NIH; and ultimately lead to stronger clinical practice, health policy, and community health programs.

The ODP is the lead office at the NIH responsible for assessing, facilitating, and stimulating research in disease prevention and disseminating the results of this research to improve public health. For more information about the ODP and its work, visit the ODP website.

Thank you in advance for taking the survey – your participation helps improve the rigor, impact, and value of research supported by the NIH.

November 2, 2018: EMBED Pragmatic Trial of User-Centered Clinical Decision Support to Implement Emergency Department-Initiated Buprenorphine for Opioid Use Disorder (Ted Melnick, MD, Gail D’Onofrio, MD)

Speakers

Ted Melnick, MD, MHS
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
Program Director, ACGME Clinical Informatics Fellowship
Yale School of Medicine

Gail D’Onofrio, MD
Professor and Chair of Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine
Physician-in-Chief of Emergency Services Yale-New Haven Hospital

Topic

EMBED: Pragmatic Trial of User-Centered Clinical Decision Support to Implement Emergency Department-Initiated Buprenorphine for Opioid Use Disorder

Keywords

EMBED; Embedded PCT; Pragmatic clinical trial; Opioid use disorder; Clinical decision support; Emergency department; Buprenorphine

Key Points

  • The EMBED pragmatic trial is evaluating a clinical decision support tool designed to automatically identify and facilitate management of eligible patients with opioid use disorder in the emergency department (ED).
  • From July 2016 to Sep 2017, there was a 30% increase in visits to the ED for opioid overdose (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, March 9, 2018).
  • With medication-assisted treatment, patients are 2 times more likely to be engaged in addiction treatment at 30 days.
  • EMBED’s user-centered design aims to streamline workflows, address barriers to adoption, embed ED-initiated buprenorphine into routine ED care, and optimize adoption, dissemination, implementation, and scalability.

Discussion Themes

Poor usability of health information technology (HIT) is major source of frustration for clinicians. Electronic health record usability is a fundamental barrier to implementation of evidence-based medicine.

The science of usability in healthcare is still in the early stages. The EMBED study wants to improve the HIT experience.

How much does the study rely on EHR data for outcomes, and how detailed are the pilot outcomes data requested from each system? How do you plan to verify the accuracy of those data?

For more information on treatment of opioid use disorder in the emergency department, visit the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) website’s Initiating Buprenorphine Treatment in the Emergency Department.

Tags

@Ted_Melnick, @DonofrioGail, @yaleem2, @YaleMed, @Collaboratory1, #pctGR, #EmergencyMedicine

October 19, 2018: A New Path Forward for Using Decentralized Clinical Trials (Jeffry Florian, PhD, Annemarie Forrest, Penny Randall, MD, MBA)

Speakers

Jeffry Florian, PhD
Clinical Analyst, Office of New Drugs
FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)

Annemarie Forrest
Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI)

Penny Randall, MD, MBA
VP and Global Therapeutic Head, CNS
IQVIA

Topic

A New Path Forward for Using Decentralized Clinical Trials

Keywords

Decentralized clinical trials; Telemedicine; Mobile health; Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative; FDA

Key Points

  • Decentralized clinical trials (DCTs) are defined as those executed through telemedicine, mobile, or local healthcare providers (HCPs), using procedures that vary from the traditional clinical trial model; for example, shipping investigational medical product directly to the trial participant.
  • DCTs are not “all or nothing.” They exist in a broad continuum and can expand the reach of traditional clinical trial sites.
  • Potential benefits of DCTs apply to all trials in all disease areas but may offer particular advantages in rare diseases, where patients are generally limited in number or are highly geographically dispersed.
  • Mobile HCP training is similar to that required for standard investigative sites: Good clinical practice, protocol-specific training, human subject protections, data protection, and clinical trial billing.

Discussion Themes

Will a decentralized trial lead to less diverse patient populations as participants will need to be technology literate and have access to technology?

Decentralized clinical trial safety monitoring plans should not be held to a higher standard than with traditional trials unless merited by a particular circumstance. It is important to develop protocol-specific safety monitoring and communication escalation plans.

Download CTTI’s recommendations for decentralized clinical trials.

Tags

#telemedicine #pctGR, @PCTGrandRounds, @Collaboratory1, @CTTI_Trials @IQVIA_global @US_FDA

October 1, 2018: Meeting Minutes from NIH Collaboratory’s Regulatory/Ethics Core Discussions with the New Demonstration Projects

Meeting minutes and supplementary materials are available that summarize discussions related to the ethics and regulatory issues associated with each of the new UG3 Demonstration Projects. These discussions, which took place by teleconference, included representation from study principal investigators and study teams, members of the NIH Collaboratory Regulatory/Ethics Core, NIH staff, and NIH Collaboratory Coordinating Center personnel as well as some IRBs responsible for oversight of the projects.

September 14, 2018: Advancing the Use of Mobile Technologies for Data Capture & Improved Clinical Trials (John Hubbard, PhD, Barry Peterson, PhD, Cheryl Grandinetti, PharmD)

Speakers

John Hubbard, PhD
Healthcare Strategic Advisory Board
Genstar Capital

Barry Peterson, PhD
Independent Consultant

Cheryl Grandinetti, PharmD
Office of Compliance, Office of Scientific Investigations, Division of Clinical Compliance Evaluation
Center for Drug Evaluation and Research
Food and Drug Administration

Topic

Advancing the Use of Mobile Technologies for Data Capture & Improved Clinical Trials

Keywords

Clinical trials; Mobile health technologies; Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative; CTTI; FDA; Data integrity

Key Points

  • The goal of CTTI’s Mobile Clinical Trials program is to develop evidence-based recommendations that affect the widespread adoption and use of mobile technology in clinical trials for regulatory submission.
  • Potential benefits of using mobile technology include higher quality, patient-centric endpoints and fewer barriers to participation in clinical trials.
  • Data access issues to consider before selecting a mobile technology include:
    • How will the data generated by the mobile technology be accessed and used by the manufacturer?
    • What data will be provided by the manufacturer to the sponsor?
  • The mobile era creates new data security demands.

Discussion Themes

CTTI’s recommendations aim to help sponsors determine the right device to use, how to write the protocol for remote data capture, and how to protect and analyze the data.

Know what you want to measure before selecting the mobile technology. The appropriateness of the selection should be justified through verification and validation processes.

Ensure the authenticity, integrity, and confidentiality of data over its entire lifecycle.

To reduce risk in large trials, conduct feasibility studies before full implementation.

Visit CTTI for more recommendations and resources for mobile clinical trials.

 

Tags

@CTTI_Trials, @PCTGrandRounds, #MobileTech, #pctGR

August 9, 2018: New Interview with Dr. David Shurtleff about the NIH Collaboratory

In a recent video interview, Dr. David Shurtleff, acting director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), discusses the unique work of the Collaboratory in bringing together multiple NIH Institutes and Centers to develop best practices, methods, guidance, and tools for conducting rigorous pragmatic research.

“The Collaboratory has been transformative in how it’s developed a novel, supportive infrastructure to conduct pragmatic research in a way that allows it to be embedded within healthcare systems.” David Shurtleff, PhD

June 14, 2018: NIH Collaboratory Members to Host Session on Embedded PCTs at AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting

The upcoming AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting, June 24-26, 2018, will feature a special session on Embedding Pragmatic Clinical Trials in Health Care Systems: Trials and Tribulations, Monday, June 25, at 5:15 pm, hosted by members of the Health Care Systems Interactions Core Working Group:

Chair: Cathy Meyers, MD, NIH/NICCH

Discussant: Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Speakers: Vince Mor, PhD, Brown University School of Public Health; Greg Simon, MD, MPH, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute; and Lynn DeBar, PhD, MPH, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Held at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle, this large gathering of health services researchers and policy analysts will include workshops, poster and podium sessions, emerging issues panels, policy roundtables, and special topic sessions. Other NIH Collaboratory members planning to present at the meeting include Leah Tuzzio, MPH, Jerry Jarvik, MD, MPH, Miguel Vazquez, MD, Kathryn James, MPH, Gloria Coronado, PhD, and Beverly Green, MD, MPH.

 “Attendees will learn about the challenges of pilot testing, studying patient-reported outcomes, using existing data, and the multiple levels of implementation in dynamic systems.” – Leah Tuzzio, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

For details, visit the meeting event site at http://www.academyhealth.org/events/site/2018-annual-research-meeting.

June 4, 2018: New Article Explores Misleading Use of the Label “Pragmatic” for Some Randomized Clinical Trials

A recent study published in BMC Medicine found that many randomized controlled trials (RCTs) self-labeled as “pragmatic” were actually explanatory in nature, in that they assessed investigational medicines compared with placebo to test efficacy before licensing. Of the RCTs studied, one-third were pre-licensing, single-center, or placebo-controlled trials and thus not appropriately described as pragmatic.

Appropriately describing the design and characteristics of a pragmatic trial helps readers understand the trial’s relevance for real-world practice. The authors explain that RCTs suitably termed pragmatic compare the effectiveness of 2 available medicines or interventions prescribed in routine clinical care. The purpose of such pragmatic RCTs is to provide real-world evidence for which interventions should be recommended or prioritized.

The authors recommend that investigators use a standard tool, such as the CONSORT Pragmatic Trials extension or the PRECIS-2 tool, to prospectively evaluate the pragmatic characteristics of their RCTs. Use of these tools can also assist funders, ethics committees, and journal editors in determining whether an RCT has been accurately labeled as pragmatic.

The BMC Medicine article cites NIH Collaboratory publications by Ali et al. and Johnson et al., as well as the Living Textbook, in its discussion of pragmatic RCTs and the tools available to assess their relevance for real-world practice.

“Submissions of RCTs to funders, research ethics committees, and peer-reviewed journals should include a PRECIS-2 tool assessment done by the trial investigators. Clarity and accuracy on the extent to which an RCT is pragmatic will help [to] understand how much it is relevant to real-world practice.” (Dal-Ré et al. 2018)