December 7, 2018: Cluster Randomized Trials in Health Care Delivery Systems: Lessons from STIC2IT (Niteesh K. Choudhry, MD, PhD)

Speaker

Niteesh K. Choudhry, MD, PhD
Professor, Harvard Medical School
Executive Director, Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Topic

Cluster Randomized Trials in Health Care Delivery Systems: Lessons from STIC2IT

Keywords

STIC2IT; Pragmatic clinical trial; Learning health system; Cluster randomization; Medication adherence; Telepharmacy; Electronic health record; Stakeholder engagement

Key Points

  • STIC2IT, a pragmatic, cluster-randomized trial, evaluated a telepharmacy intervention to improve medication adherence for people with chronic diseases.
  • Pragmatic aspects of STIC2IT included outcomes assessed using routinely collected data, cluster randomization by physician practice, intention-to-treat analysis, and use of the EHR to collect research data.
  •  While medication adherence did improve in the STIC2IT intervention group, secondary clinical outcomes did not improve. Future trials within health systems should incorporate multilevel engagement across the health system, physicians and staff, and patients.

Discussion Themes

It is important to do ongoing outreach at the health system leadership level to ensure understanding and commitment to the study and keep providers aware of the trial. Study teams should be mindful of the priorities of their partner health system.

Using the EHR for research data required some upfront work building special modules and generating custom reports.

For more information on conducting PCTs in health delivery systems, visit the Living Textbook chapter on engaging stakeholders and building partnerships.

Tags

@Collaboratory1, #pctGR, #HarvardMed, #telepharmacy

November 16, 2018: Primary Palliative Care for Emergency Medicine (PRIM-ER) (Corita Grudzen, MD, MSHS)

Speaker

Corita R. Grudzen, MD, MSHS, FACEP
Vice Chair for Research
Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Population Health
Ronald O. Perelman Department of Emergency Medicine
NYU School of Medicine

Topic

Primary Palliative Care for Emergency Medicine (PRIM-ER)

Keywords

PRIM-ER; Emergency department; Palliative care; Demonstration project; Pragmatic trial; Stepped-wedge study design; Clinical decision support; Best practice alerts; Advance care planning

Key Point

  • The PRIM-ER trial is a pragmatic, cluster-randomized, stepped wedge Demonstration Project that will implement primary palliative care in emergency medicine across a diverse group of 35 emergency departments (EDs).
  • PRIM-ER’s clinical decision support intervention is tailored to each ED site. The study aims to enable system, organizational, and provider change in the emergency department workflow.
  • The study team is identifying and preparing site champions by conducting communication skills training in serious illness for emergency physicians and staff using the EM Talk program.

Discussion Themes

It is important to consider sustainability of the intervention during the planning phase of the trial. Plan for staff turnover and how new staff will be educated and oriented to the intervention.

The volume and sophistication of best practice alerts (BPAs) received by physicians varies across U.S. emergency departments. Alert “fatigue” can be a concern.

For more information on the PRIM-ER Demonstration Project, visit the PRIM-ER website on the Living Textbook.

Tags

@Collaboratory1, #pctGR, #EmergencyMedicine

November 2, 2018: EMBED Pragmatic Trial of User-Centered Clinical Decision Support to Implement Emergency Department-Initiated Buprenorphine for Opioid Use Disorder (Ted Melnick, MD, Gail D’Onofrio, MD)

Speakers

Ted Melnick, MD, MHS
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
Program Director, ACGME Clinical Informatics Fellowship
Yale School of Medicine

Gail D’Onofrio, MD
Professor and Chair of Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine
Physician-in-Chief of Emergency Services Yale-New Haven Hospital

Topic

EMBED: Pragmatic Trial of User-Centered Clinical Decision Support to Implement Emergency Department-Initiated Buprenorphine for Opioid Use Disorder

Keywords

EMBED; Embedded PCT; Pragmatic clinical trial; Opioid use disorder; Clinical decision support; Emergency department; Buprenorphine

Key Points

  • The EMBED pragmatic trial is evaluating a clinical decision support tool designed to automatically identify and facilitate management of eligible patients with opioid use disorder in the emergency department (ED).
  • From July 2016 to Sep 2017, there was a 30% increase in visits to the ED for opioid overdose (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, March 9, 2018).
  • With medication-assisted treatment, patients are 2 times more likely to be engaged in addiction treatment at 30 days.
  • EMBED’s user-centered design aims to streamline workflows, address barriers to adoption, embed ED-initiated buprenorphine into routine ED care, and optimize adoption, dissemination, implementation, and scalability.

Discussion Themes

Poor usability of health information technology (HIT) is major source of frustration for clinicians. Electronic health record usability is a fundamental barrier to implementation of evidence-based medicine.

The science of usability in healthcare is still in the early stages. The EMBED study wants to improve the HIT experience.

How much does the study rely on EHR data for outcomes, and how detailed are the pilot outcomes data requested from each system? How do you plan to verify the accuracy of those data?

For more information on treatment of opioid use disorder in the emergency department, visit the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) website’s Initiating Buprenorphine Treatment in the Emergency Department.

Tags

@Ted_Melnick, @DonofrioGail, @yaleem2, @YaleMed, @Collaboratory1, #pctGR, #EmergencyMedicine

October 12, 2018: MDEpiNet RAPID and SPEED Projects: Leveraging Real World Evidence to Get Better, Faster, Cheaper Medical Devices for Physicians and Patients (Renee Mitchell, MT, CLS, Terrie Reed, MSIE, Roseann White, MA)

Speakers

Renee Mitchell, MT(ASCP), CLS(NCA)
Regulatory Affairs
Boston Scientific Corporation, Inc.

Terrie Reed, MSIE
Senior Advisor for UDI Adoption
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Roseann White, MA
Director of Innovative Clinical Trial Statistics
Duke Clinical Research Institute

Topic

MDEpiNet RAPID and SPEED Projects: Leveraging Real World Evidence to Get Better, Faster, Cheaper Medical Devices for Physicians and Patients

Keywords

Medical devices; Real-world evidence; Medical Device Epidemiology Network; MDEpiNet; Unique device identifier; UDI

Key Points

  • In partnership, clinicians, device developers, and FDA can benefit from the use of real-world evidence on medical devices:
    •  Clinicians can contribute to the generation of real-world evidence.
    •  Device manufacturers can use real-world evidence to evaluate and release new devices and expand indications.
    •  Regulatory bodies can increase the use of patient-level data for device approval.
  • Unique device identifiers (UDIs) make it possible to follow medical devices longitudinally, advancing the quality of real-world evidence and allowing more sophisticated analyses.

Discussion Themes

The vision for the future is that registries will transform into big data solutions using multiple sources and will be more robustly integrated with electronic health records (EHRs). Both EHRs and registries will play a role.

More organizations as partners brings greater diversity, advancing better data and results. When stakeholders work together, learning curves can be accelerated toward a transformational approach to real-world evidence.

Tags

#MedicalDevices, #pctGR, @PCTGrandRounds, @Collaboratory1, @MDEpiNet_ppp

September 7, 2018: Spotlight on a New Demonstration Project: HiLo

Kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but an insufficient organ supply renders dialysis the only viable treatment option for most patients. Though clinical outcomes among patients receiving dialysis have improved modestly in recent years, annual rates of hospitalization and mortality remain unacceptably high, and quality of life is poor. Poor outcomes are driven primarily by increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but interventions that improve outcomes in the general population by targeting traditional CVD risk factors have mostly failed in patients with ESRD. Current clinical practice guidelines advocate aggressive treatment of high serum phosphate to near-normal levels using dietary phosphate binders and restrictive diets. The benefits of this approach, however, are unproven, the optimal serum phosphate target remains unknown, and potential harms of aggressive treatment have not been definitively identified.

The Pragmatic Trial of Higher vs. Lower Serum Phosphate Targets in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis (HiLo) plans to address these clinically important questions in a large, pragmatic, cluster-randomized trial that will evaluate the effects of liberalizing the serum phosphate target (“Hi”) versus maintaining aggressive phosphate control (“Lo”) for patients receiving treatment with maintenance hemodialysis.

 “The question at hand is something we grapple with on a daily basis in every dialysis facility across the country. Either answer will be important new information that will help us do a better job taking care of patients and hopefully improve their quality of life.”

HiLo is led by Myles Wolf, MD, of Duke University with support from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Read more about HiLo.

August 20, 2018: Spotlight on a New Demonstration Project: EMBED

The NIH Collaboratory is pleased to introduce the Pragmatic Trial of User-Centered Clinical Decision Support to Implement Emergency Department-Initiated Buprenorphine for Opioid Use Disorder (EMBED). Led by co–principal investigators Dr. Ted Melnick and Dr. Gail D’Onofrio of Yale University, and supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, EMBED is a pragmatic, multicenter, group-randomized trial that will implement and evaluate a user-centered clinical decision support tool to facilitate the initiation of buprenorphine/naloxone therapy for opioid use disorder in emergency departments.

The intervention consists of computerized treatment guidance for emergency department physicians and is embedded in the existing care delivery workflow. By conducting the study under real-world conditions and employing passive collection of structured data from the electronic health record, EMBED will use an innovative approach to address public health concerns about opioid use in the United States. Watch a video interview with Dr. Melnick, and read more about EMBED.

“This is an area where there is already good efficacy data for the practice of ED-initiated buprenorphine treatment for patients with opioid use disorder, but the practice is not part of routine care right now.” — Ted Melnick, MD, MHS

 

EMBED is 1 of 6 new large-scale clinical trials launched by the NIH Collaboratory in 2018. The Demonstration Projects are multicenter pragmatic trials that engage healthcare delivery systems in research partnerships to gather real-world evidence and answer clinical questions of major public health importance. Learn more about the Demonstration Projects.

Patient-Reported Outcomes Workshop Report Available


Tools for ResearchIn January of 2015, the NIH HCS Collaboratory’s Patient-Reported Outcomes (PRO) Core Group convened a 2-day workshop in Baltimore devoted to identifying barriers and possible solutions to the use of NIH-supported PRO tools in comparative-effectiveness research (CER).

Findings from the meeting, which include case study presentations and reflections from multiple stakeholders representing the research, clinical, and patient communities, were distilled into a summary document available from the NIH Collaboratory Knowledge Repository at the link below:

The workshop summary is also available on the Living Textbook’s “Tools for Research” section, under “Patient-Reported Outcomes White Paper.